Saturday, August 14, 2010




My awesome friend Rivka staged a one-woman XMRV protest in D.C. I'm posting some pics and her YouTube video, along with her unedited account of events and explanation of her mission. For those who are well enough to do it, get out and X-ACT-UP!



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FROM RIVKA:
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Aug 14, 2010

Dear Everyone Who Cares About People With ME/CFS,

I just held my one-woman demonstration at the Red Cross national headquarters in Washington DC (Red Cross collects 45% of all blood donations in this country) and at the national headquarters of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and it was a success. Here is the video.



On the first day of our protests, August 13, 2010, our first stop was the Red Cross headquarters. Lots of security showed up within minutes of me being there, but I simply educated them about XMRV. :-) This is how it went: My mom (the designated driver and videographer) started videotaping me standing in front of the front door while people were walking in and out of the building. A security guard walked up to me within two minutes and said I could not videotape and hold my signs there. I said "What about over there?" pointing to the sidewalk, not five feet away, but still in front of the door. She said she could not stop me from doing that. So I stepped five feet forward and proceeded with my signholding and talking into the video camera.

Her supervisor showed up a few minutes later and and spent all of his time on a cell phone describing to someone else what I was doing. I stopped the videotaping and turned around to ask him, "Who are you talking to?" He told me he was talking to his director. So I asked if he wanted me to talk to the director and tell him/her why I was there, protesting. No, was the answer. So I said, "Do you want me to tell YOU why I'm here? Would you like to see my signs?" (Who wouldn't? They are so colorful!) Yes, he said. So I told him about how long I've been sick (20 yrs) with CFS and how, finally, medical researchers may have found the potential cause of my illness, a new retrovirus called XMRV, and that it may already be in the nation's blood supply infecting new people who get blood transfusions. I told him how I was there to ask the National Director of the Red Cross to check the blood supply for this retrovirus.

As this went on, lots of people were walking by and many slowed down to read my signs.

Both the secrurity guard supervisor and the original security guard seemed genuinely interested, and the supervisor relayed all this info to his superior via his cell phone. Now done, I went back to my protest and holding of signs for my mom who was still at the video camera.

A few minutes later, I noticed an older man in a more professional suit-type of uniform watching me from another door. In fact, I now saw that there were a total of four security guards hanging around at different spots along the block. I asked the suited man if he was security. He did not reply. So I asked again, and he mumbled something. So I asked if he wanted to know why I was there, and when he said yes, I shared my story all over again, asking him, too, to tell the Red Cross Executive Director that I was there with my signs to ask for the nation's blood supply to be checked for the new retrovirus XMRV, and to screen all donations for this virus, and that I did not want anyone else to get sick like I have been for so many years.

After I was done, the older suited man, an African American, said, Like Arthur Ashe. "Who?" I said. Arthur Ashe, the tennis player, he repeated. He got HIV from a blood transfusion and died of AIDS, he said. "Arthur Ash!" I suddenly recalled the African American international tennis superstar and racial barrier breaker. "Yes, exactly!" Then the security director for the Red Cross (anyway, that is who I think he was) wrote down "XMRV" on a piece of paper so that he would remember the exact name to tell the head of the Red Cross, and we said goodbye. I finished up my videotaping and my mom and I moved on to the national headquarters of Health and Human Services, a few miles away.

There, it was a different story. This huge building is across the street, literally, from the U.S. Capitol Building. We were going to shoot the video by the HHS sign near the street, on the sidewalk, but it started to rain, so we ran to the building's front door and under the cement overhang. Security was super tight. We were there for about half a minute, getting in place for the shoot, when a security guard said we had to stop. I asked why. She called her superior and about three guys showed up. The head honcho told us we could not shoot the video if the camera was facing the HHS building (and what was the point of shooting the video there if it wasn't?). We were told to move. Period. We did. Nothing. We got nothing on video.

That night, reviewing the less than perfect Red Cross video made it clear we needed to go back. We decided to consider that day's efforts a practice run. So we drove back the next day and we shot it all, all over again -- this time in front of the HHS sign by the street and back in front of the Red Cross. No problem, after all, we were on the sidewalks this time. All legal.

My reason for doing these demonstrations -- my goal -- is found below. In short, I hope to inspire many other one-person demonstrations like this around the globe. With luck and media outreach, we'll get media coverage -- and that will impact the political situation surrounding ME/CFS, the politics that has, for so long, dictated our lives. See my note below, it is the same thing I said in my videos.

With hope for our future,
Rivka
Rivka (at) ThatTakesOvaries.org

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People with ME/CFS:

It has long been a tradition of our democracy that when a people feel their needs and concerns are not being heard by their government they will demonstrate and protest.

This is a tried and true tradition of any democracy.

If we can have 100s of these mini-protests, like mine (of one, two or five people), happening around the country and globe, in front of our government offices and our blood donation centers and blood banks, we may cause some waves, get some press attention, and get some clinical trials and funding for ME/CFS and XMRV research.

Remember, protests and demonstrations -- holding up a sign in a public place stating your views -- are part of the democratic process. Let your voice be heard!

* * *

Dear Health and Human Services Director, Kathleen Sebelius,

I have spend way too much of the past 20 years bedridden and homebound with Chronic Fatigue syndome, an illness with a belitting name for a disability so severe.

According to the Centers for Disease Control there are 1 to 4 million Americas like me, all sick with ME/CFS.

Every year of the past 20 yrs, I hope and hope that my government will do what a government is supposed to do, and help its people -- help me. But every year I am deeply disappointed.

The National Institutes of Health, the NIH, invests $31 billion dollars annually in medical research for the American people. But of that $31 billion, in 2009 CFS research got $5 million -- about the same as what the NIH dedicates to Hay Fever, and about a 1/3rd of what is dedicated to Psoriasis.

Now, with a newly discovered retrovirus called XMRV that is linked to -- and perhaps the cause of -- CFS, we have an even greater reason to stop ignoring the 1 to 4 million Americans who are so sick, so desperate and so in need of help.

Director Sebelius, please dedicate more money to researching CFS and the retrovirus XMRV. Dedicate more money to clinical trials so we can find treatments. And protect the Americans who have yet to get XMRV from blood transfusions, because this retrovirus is surely already contaminating the nation's blood supply.

Please help us.

11 comments:

Nina said...

Wow, Rivka, you rock!!!! Thanks a thousand times from a bed in Germany.

Nicky Reiss said...

Brilliant! Thank you so much! I am in awe and in gratitude to Rivka!

GadgetJunkie said...

Go Rivka! One of the most determined people I know. Would that we all could have been there with her in body as well as spirit. Jan (showercap lady)

zombie said...

Thank you, Rivka! You did it! And what an example you've provided for others who are able to protest like this!

Kati Debelic said...

Way to go!!! Great job Rivka!

Patricia said...

Rivka, this is great! Thank you so much for doing this. You spoke for a lot of people (like me) who are just too sick to do it.

Elisa said...

Hi Rivka!

Fantastic job - so so happy for you giving us a voice - cried and clapped outloud after watching your video. So proud of your efforts, so grateful for your voice!

Elisabeth

Judi said...

Nice to meet you.....Peggy. I've been planning a one woman protest in my mind for a while now. I can't get to DC, but I can get to the NBC studio here in Chicago where they have a similar set up to the New York studio. You are very motivating, thank you.

Peggy said...

Judi, if you do it, I will gladly post it as I did Rivka's protest. Go for it! Illinois is my home state.

Earth's Little Treasures Hand-made Jewelry said...

Rivka,
Never doubt that one person can make a difference...I think you will find that you have just proved the above statement with your one woman protest. Many thanks go to not only you, but your mom too!

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